About Wabi-Sabi

About Wabi-Sabi

Perfectly made wines can often seem smooth and soon bore us. So, here is our range of Wabi-Sabi wines: Wines with a certain roughness, wines with an edge. But what does Wabi-Sabi mean?

As so often, Wikipedia is helpful:

In traditional Japanese aesthetics, Wabi-sabi (侘寂) is a world view centered on the acceptance of transience and imperfection. The aesthetic is sometimes described as one of beauty that is „imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete“. It is a concept derived from the Buddhist teaching of the three marks of existence (三法印 sanbōin), specifically impermanence (無常 mujō), suffering (苦 ku) and emptiness or absence of self-nature (空 kū).

Characteristics of the wabi-sabi aesthetic include asymmetry, roughness, simplicity, economy, austerity, modesty, intimacy, and appreciation of the ingenuous integrity of natural objects and processes.

In today’s Japan, the meaning of wabi-sabi is often condensed to „wisdom in natural simplicity.“

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wabi-sabi

In a wine, we may experience Wabi-Sabi in the moment, when we have a sense of the wine as a whole, not a succession of different components like tannin, acidity, sweetness etc. Wabi-Sabi can capture a complexity that we cannot easily express in words.

Alder Yarrow gives a good attempt of an explanation about how Wabi-Sabi and wine can be related on his blog www.vinography.com :

“These are wines that are not symmetrical, nor polished perfectly smooth. They have rough edges. They do not follow a formula. They do not harmonize in major chords; they have a faint minor key to them. They show their patina of age, or in the roughness of their youth they choose not to obscure their rawness with anything, but leave it bare to my palate.Wines that are wabi-sabi evoke something deeper than flavors, deeper even than a place. Wabi-sabi involves a deep connection with reality, in a way that is unvarnished, but also rich and profound in its intimacy. And this is what I find in the most magical wines.”

http://www.vinography.com/archives/2010/08/the_philosophy_of_wabi-sabi_an.html